Month: April 2020

Cook Forest State Park

Cook Forest State Park

The 8,500-acre Cook Forest State Park lies in scenic northwestern Pennsylvania. Once called the `Black Forest,` the area is famous for its stands of old growth forest. Cook Forest’s `Forest Cathedral` of towering white pines and hemlocks is a National Natural Landmark. The Clarion River 

Colonel Denning State Park

Colonel Denning State Park

Colonel Denning State Park, in north central Cumberland County, is in Doubling Gap, so named by the `S` turn where Blue Mountain doubles back on itself. This feature may be seen from the Doubling Gap Vista in adjacent Tuscarora State Forest. The park has 273 

Point State Park

Point State Park

Once the site of three forts, the park was completed and dedicated in 1974. In 1975, Point State Park was designated a National Historic Landmark. Today you can still see the outlines where the original structures stood.

After you’re done, you can enjoy fishing, boating and hiking. Bring a picnic and make a day of it!

Point State Park is owned and operated by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of State Parks and works in collaboration with the Heinz History Center and the Fort Pitt Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

It also has two museums, Fort Pitt Museum and the Fort Pitt Blockhouse. Call for tour times.

 

Bendigo State Park

Bendigo State Park

The 100-acre Bendigo State Park is in a small valley surrounded with many picturesque hills. About 20 acres of the park is developed, half of which is a large shaded picnic area. The forest is predominantly northern hardwoods and includes beech, birch, cherry and maple. 

Varden Conservation Area

Varden Conservation Area

The gift of veterinarian Dr. Mead Shaffer, the 343-acre Varden Conservation Area is in Wayne County. This magnanimous gift of land is a pristine area in a once-remote section of the state that now is beginning to feel the pressure of development. It will be 

Yellow Creek State Park

Yellow Creek State Park

The 2,981-acre Yellow Creek State Park is in Indiana County along one of the first “highways” in the state, the Kittanning Path. This trail was used by the Delaware and Shawnee nations and by early settlers.

Today, visitors enjoy the sand beach, picnicking and the educational programs. The 720-acre Yellow Creek Lake is a destination for boaters and anglers. The lake and park are an important rest stop for migrating birds.

The park is named for Yellow and Little Yellow creeks, which create the lake. The creeks have lots of yellow clay in the banks and bottoms.

This area offers hiking, mountain biking, camping, picnicking, boating, swimming and fishing. In the winter you can also icefish, ice skate, ice boat, snowmobile, sled and tubing, and cross country skiing.

Camping Cabins and Yurts are available by reservation.

Sturgis Pretzel Bakery

Sturgis Pretzel Bakery

During your tour, each person is given their own piece of dough and taught how to twist a pretzel.They also get to see the ovens and visit the kitchens where the pretzels are made.

GoggleWorks Center for The Arts

GoggleWorks Center for The Arts

Once you visit the GoggleWorks Center for the Arts, you’ll want to go back again and again!

Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania

Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania

Set on 92 Acres, the Morris Arboretum is Pennsylvania’s Official Arboretum. Open all year, patrons can experience all the seasons and see some of Pennsylvania’s oldest trees. There are over 13,000 plants to explore and learn about.

There are many attractions included in the arboretum, but the favorite is “Out on a Limb”, the tree house, 50ft in the air. With netting and a human-size nest, visitors can get a birds eye view of the facility.

Living Treasures Animal Park – Donegal

Living Treasures Animal Park – Donegal

At Living Treasures in Moraine, you can see and interact with hundreds of animals from around the world. There are several species of birds, primates, big cats, reptiles and more! Featured exhibits include a rare white tiger, near extinct barbary lions, laughing hyenas, and large 

Knoebels Grove

Knoebels Grove

Admission and Parking is free – so get on out to Elysburg and enjoy the park.  Rides do cost though and a day pass is only $31 (2011).  There are traditional, new and favorite amusement rides, plus a huge swimming pool, rope climb and waterslides. 

Laurel Caverns

Laurel Caverns

Laurel Caverns, the largest cave system in Pennsylvania, is located 2,600′ above sea level in Fayette county, PA.  On a clear day, you can see four surrounding counties, the Pittsburgh skyline and of course, Fayette county.

The three miles of paths through the caverns average about 12′ high and generally range from 10′ to 20′ high, with some ceilings reaching 50′.

The traditional guided tour is one hour and covers about 3,000′ of walking distance.  No special equipment is needed, but the caverns are 52 degrees all the time and there are slopes and steps.  All passages on the traditional guided tour are lighted.

Spelunking, caving and rappelling are all available for an extra fee, although release forms and age restrictions may apply.

LancasterHistory.Org

LancasterHistory.Org

LancasterHistory.org is a combination of the Lancaster County’s Historical Society and President James Buchanan’s Wheatland. This large campus  contains not only an archive, library and exhibition gallery, it also has on it’s ground the Tanger Arboretum. This national landmark has just reopened in the spring 

Big Spring State Park

Big Spring State Park

Tucked in the side of Conococheague Mountain, Big Spring State Park is a quaint picnic and hiking area. A short loop trail leads to a partially completed railroad tunnel with historic interpretation at the trailhead. The park also provides access to the Iron Horse Trail 

Wildwater Kingdom at Dorney Park

Wildwater Kingdom at Dorney Park

Looking to cool off at one of the best waterparks in the world? Look no further than Dorney Park & Wildwater Kingdom.

Visitors to Wildwater Kingdom enjoy one of the largest collections of water attractions on the planet.

Adding to its collection of 18 water slides, a tubing adventure, activity pools and other water activities, Wildwater Kingdom is home to two wave pools in 2006. The addition of another wave pool makes Wildwater Kingdom one of the only waterparks in the country to offer a double dose of wave pool fun.

The additional wave pool is approximately two-thirds the size of the existing giant wave pool. Guests enjoy a unique experience with added features in the new wave pool such as geysers and wall sprays in the shallow end.

Both wave pools use the latest in wave pool technology by generating waves pneumatically which provides guests with the sensation of the ocean, but without the seaweed and jellyfish.

Guests who wish to soak up the sun can lounge in a chair on the renovated midways around the new wave pool and enjoy the additional space for sunbathing while guests looking to escape from the summer sun can seek out one of many new cabanas being offered for rent.

Those who dare, challenge body slides and tubing slides of all sizes and one of the longest elevated water slides in the world. For the little ones, there are three aquatic playlands to splash around in and get wet.

There is more fun for the entire family in an interactive water funhouse, two tubing rivers and other splash zones to cool down in and escape from the summer heat.