Author: Cheryl

William Penn Memorial Fire Tower

William Penn Memorial Fire Tower

A spiral staircase containing 120 steel steps leads to an enclosed observation deck. The deck is encased in glass block for year round enjoyment. From there you’re able to see as far as 5th and Penn sts.

Erie Art Museum

Erie Art Museum

What’s now known as the Erie Art Museum continues to grow and expand so you never know what you’ll find on your next visit!

Rodin Museum

Rodin Museum

In 1929 the Rodin museum opened it’s doors for the first time. One of his most recognizable pieces is “The Thinker”. Through the years the Museum of Art has kept up the Rodin Museum but found the building and surrounding french garden small and overgrown. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society teamed up with the Philadelphia Art Museum and through their efforts, along with support from the Philadelphia Department of Parks and Recreation spent three years on a rejuvenation project to see that the Rodin Museum was again one of the jewels of the Philadelphia Parkway.

 

 

Pymatuning State Park

Pymatuning State Park

While you’re there you can visit the Pennsylvania Spillway and it’s incredible phenomenom of “ducks walking on water”, where the fish come to be feed by the visitors and are so dense, the duck walk along their backs to share the food!

Sturgis Pretzel Bakery

Sturgis Pretzel Bakery

During your tour, each person is given their own piece of dough and taught how to twist a pretzel.They also get to see the ovens and visit the kitchens where the pretzels are made.

Altoona Railroad Museum

Altoona Railroad Museum

The Altoona Railroaders Memorial Museum, set in Altoona at the foot of the Allegheny Mountains, has duplicated life in Altoona when the Pennsylvania Railroad was booming, back in the early 1950s.

There are three floors to the museum and each floor has a unique prespective of Pennsylvania History. They allow you to take your time and explore what it was like to work in different areas of the Pnnsylvania Railroad.

Sit and watch the short films about railroading in the Altoona Railroad Museum Theater.

The third floor is the Children’s Museum and hands on! They have toy trains the kids love playing with while mom and dad go browse the museum.

GPS Address:
1500 Glenn White Road
Altoona, PA 16602

Awbury Arboretum

Awbury Arboretum

Opened year round to experience the wonder of each season and the beauty of nature as it happens. It brings out the photographer in all of us.

Mack Truck Plant and Museum

Mack Truck Plant and Museum

With more than 80,000 photos on file along with it’s exhibits, this museum would make anyone nostalgic.

The Insectarium

The Insectarium

The Insectarium,  was opened in 1992 by Steve Kanya, who owned Steve’s Bug-Off Exterminating Company.

Imagine, if you can, a kitchen deliberately infested with big cockroaches. Thousands of big cockroaches, scuttling across every surface. The kind of roaches that turn into an airborne swarm when conditions are right.

And then the power goes out.

Actually, this amusing scenario hasn’t happened. Yet. Which is why we should all hope that the power never goes out in the Insectarium.

The second floor is where visitors are offered the opportunity to eat cheddar-flavored beetle larvae. They say the average American ingests up to two pounds of bug parts each year, mostly mixed in with their vegetables.

The third floor of the attraction houses live exhibits: terrariums of centipedes, beetles, stink bugs, tarantulas. The Black Widow and Ecuadorian Bird-Eating spiders are cozy neighbors. In one corner is a pet-a-bug table, where visitors are invited to stroke a Madagascar hissing cockroach and a whip-tail scorpion. Kids can pose as insects or can crawl through a bungee-cord spider’s web. Hand-painted murals of oversized ladybugs, caterpillars, and spiders fill the walls.

Jean Bonnet Tavern

Jean Bonnet Tavern

So if you have an interest in the paranormal or if you’re just interested in “things that go bump in the night”, have a meal, get a room and see if any spectres keep you awake at night.

George’s Furniture & Wood Shop

George’s Furniture & Wood Shop

It’s amazing how they start with simple wood and turn it into a beautiful piece of furniture that will surely become the next antique to be past down in your family. It’s an experience you will always remember.

Koziar’s Christmas Village

Koziar’s Christmas Village

Started  in 1948, William Koziar would decorate his house for his wife and children. Each year he would add to the display, decorating the barn, trees or lake. By now his neighbors nick-named it the “Christmas House”.  At this point, due to overwhelming demand, he would open the property to visitors.

Sixty-six years and several awards later, the Christmas House has grown into the Christmas Village. With over a million lights, hundreds of animatronic characters, multiple glass displays, plus the tried and true “Picture with Santa”; millions come from all over to walk through the village. Some make it a annual tradition.

Make sure to dress warm and have your walking shoes on, there’s a lot of ground to cover, so give yourself enough time and get there early because people will start parking before dusk. If you have little ones, I suggest a stroller.

Koziars has been named the best light display in the world. It is absolutely worth the trip! Make it your new tradition.

Linvilla Orchards

Linvilla Orchards

They have hayrides,a lake for fishing, a playground, a swim team. They even offer classes periodically.

The Gazela

The Gazela

It’s a great chance for kids and adults alike to see first hand the history of a hand-made vessel. It might even bring out a little pirate in ya!

BWP Bat Factory Tours

BWP Bat Factory Tours

How cool is this? BWP makes baseball bats. The same bats used by Shane Victorino and Manny Ramirez. Not only that, but  they follow the process from the harvesting of the trees to the finished product

BWP produces about 2000 bats a week. Some of their best craftsmen are actually former baseball players. If they don’t know bats, who does?

BWP Bats start from select trees from Western Pennsylvania that are aged to maturity.  They harvest the trees and select which ones are suitable for bats, which is less than 20% .  Wood that will not make a bat go into some other products they make. BWP has a guided tour through their factory. It also has an outlet shop that offers personalized gifts.

Why not use the bat favored by some of the pro’s?